Carolina Energy 2019 – A Blueprint for States and Consumers

As ECC was researching its look at 2019 in energy we found two recent reports that provide good high-level strategies for electric energy. While the reports are not specifically focused on the Carolinas or the Southeast, the topics in the reports absolutely apply to the Carolinas. Taken together the material in these reports can help guide Read more about Carolina Energy 2019 – A Blueprint for States and Consumers[…]

These Veterans Give Us Energy – In Conclusion

In the past several blogs Energy Consumers of the Carolinas has introduced you to a few of the veterans who also work in the energy industry in the Carolinas. Veterans make up an important part of our energy industry, bringing a discipline, steadfastness, and skill sets that help keep the power on for us. ECC Read more about These Veterans Give Us Energy – In Conclusion[…]

Coops: Lines of Communication, Not Just Power Lines

There have been headlines about the leadership of electric cooperative boards in the Carolinas, including speculation about who may lead the largest cooperative in South Carolina. Hot topic. So when Energy Consumers of the Carolinas saw a column about board leadership written by the National Rural Electric Cooperatives (NRECA), we thought it is worth pointing Read more about Coops: Lines of Communication, Not Just Power Lines[…]

An Opportunity for Energy Decisions in South Carolina

People are watching as leaders in South Carolina make important decisions about electricity, both inside and outside the state. The decisions SC leaders make will determine how the state navigates several energy challenges, and is tough work. There are also opportunities for the state to show well in this process. Let’s be clear, though. The Read more about An Opportunity for Energy Decisions in South Carolina[…]

Power On – Rock On: A Peak Demand Analogy

When is electricity like a rock concert? Costs go up when there is a big demand for tickets (or electricity). Both industries respond to peak demand from customers by using more resources. Let’s say a musician plays a small club holding maybe 50 people. The microphone and speakers are on site, or the singer brings them. Easy Read more about Power On – Rock On: A Peak Demand Analogy[…]